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Institutes of

Epidemiology & Public Health, Inc.

Welcome to IEPH, the Institutes of Epidemiology & Public Health ... and its affiliates .... iHASE, the Institute of HIV/AIDS Surveillance & Epidemiology ... jHASE, the Journal of HIV/AIDS Surveillance & Epidemiology ... and ....  CAE, the College of Applied Epidemiology ...please join us in forging collaboration & partnerships in HIV Surveillance & applied HIV Epidemiology research in support of public health intervention programs ...
iHASE MEGACourse CAE mCC jHASE
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Institute - iHASE
Collaboration Centers + In-Service Training

About iHASE

> Vision
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Collaboration
Center Concept

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Collaboration
Center Cores/Foci

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Applied Epi
Training

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Contact Info

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> Core/Focus Areas
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Definition of a Collaboration
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Applied Epi
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The HASE
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Model
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Applied Epi Fellowship

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Curriculum

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Timeline

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Eligibility

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Application

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ShortCourse/Seminars

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MEGACourse

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Eligibility

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Application

Eligibility&Application

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Faculty/Mentors

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.
Journal - jHASE
Quality Assurance +  Continuing Education through Peer Review 

Journal jHASE Info

> About jHASE
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Focus Areas

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Article Types

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Submit Online

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College - CAE
Accreditation through College of Applied Epi

CAE - College Info 

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Fellows (FACE)

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jHASEJournal of HIV/AIDS Surveillance & Epidemiology


Journal Article Types
 
This document integrates information on the core/focus areas with article types for the journal's peer review of the proceedings of the Institute of HIV/AIDS Surveillance & Epidemiology (iHASE). More specifically, the document provides a detailed outline of the various article types that can be used to conduct quality assurance and continuing education through peer review of authors' submissions to the Journal of HIV/AIDS Surveillance & Epidemiology (jHASE).
  

1. Original articles reporting HIV/AIDS Surveillance & Epidemiologic Research and methods (including related public health conditions):

In pursuit of the jHASE objective of providing quality assurance, training and education through peer review, jHASE encourages the submission of suitable articles that report research work on all aspects of applied Public Health surveillance and Epidemiologic research on HIV/AIDS and related public health conditions. jHASE editorial processes ensure that research is reported in the most appropriate way to assure fulfilment of  journalís commitment to quality assurance and education through peer review.

  • 1.1. Research: The journal's focus is on quality assurance, training and education through peer review of submissions of full (standard) and brief (short) research articles on all aspects of applied Public Health surveillance and Epidemiologic studies or research on HIV/AIDS disease burden/risk factor assessment; prevention, treatment and care interventions (including evaluations of pilot or scaled-up implementation/translation thereof); services access, utilization, and gaps; and other HIV-related public health conditions. 

    1.1.1. Examples of article core/focus areas may include the following:

    • Disease Burden/Risk Assessment studies: 
      • Public Health surveillance of HIV/AIDS and related Epidemiologic research studies on HIV/AIDS (and related conditions);
      • Development and evaluation of HIV/AIDS surveillance systems;
    • Intervention Epidemiology Research and Development Studies: 
      • Studies in support of development, implementation and outcome evaluations of large-scale public health interventions;
      • Assessments of HIV/AIDS prevention and care guideline implementation, and service utilization, needs and gaps;
    • Additional core/focus areas of applied HIV Epidemiology are outlined in this document;
    • Other related public health studies are welcome and will be considered if relevant to the field of applied HIV/AIDS Epidemiology;

    1.1.2. Examples of article types/formats for submitting original research findings (incl. methodology reports) for quality assurance through peer review are as follows:

    • Primary research/field report formats to facilitate brief, fast-tracked/rapid and broader dissemination of scientific communications: As the standard-bearer standing at the intersection of science and applied pubic health in the nascent field of applied HIV epidemiology, specifically related to HIV surveillance and epidemiology, jHASE values brevity as the primary audience consists of applied public health practitioners, managers, epidemiologists and executives concerned with public health program policy-making, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation; disease/risk factor surveillance; and related in-service training. Described below are the primary formats for submissions of brief or standard research reports for quality assurance through peer review. In addition to new/not-yet-published reports of studies and findings of public health significance/importance including original HIV and related disease/risk factor surveillance, applied epidemiology, or field implementation/translational studies, the article sub-types below may also be used for rapid and broader dissemination of i) expanded abstracts and posters already presented at recent scientific conferences (< 5 years) or ii) a series of brief articles presenting adjusted analyses of surveillance data in publication-format supplements of an 'Epidemiologic Profile' of HIV (and related diseases) in a given jurisdiction.  
      • a) featured abstracts for rapid or broader dissemination of research reports typically consist of just a structured abstract of 350 - 450 words (with required sections following jHASE author guidelines provided under 'information for authors'), up to 3 figures/tables, and no more than 10 references;
      • b) research dispatches from the field may contain 1000 - 1500 words (including a structured abstract of 350 - 450 words), up to 4 tables/figures, and no more than 15 references; and
      • c) standard research/field reports may contain 1500 - 2000 words (including a structured abstract of 350 - 450 words), up to 5 tables/figures, and no more than 20 references;
        PLEASE NOTE: In addition to a structured abstract with the required sections, the body of each of the above 2 research articles sub-types must include all the 5 manuscript sections outlined in the jHASE author guidelines under 'information for authors', and the background and discussion sections of these article formats are expected to be very focussed in order to achieve the desired brevity of these scientific communications.
    • Expanded research/field report format: Fully-fledged expanded reports of methods and findings from original or field implementation/translational research (usually about 3000 -3500 words including a structured abstract of 350 - 450 words, up to 5 tables/figures, and 20 - 30 references). In addition to new/not-yet-published reports of studies and findings of public health significance/importance including original HIV and related disease/risk factor surveillance, applied epidemiology, or field implementation/translational studies, this expanded article format may also be used for submission of a technical addendum in an e-Document add-on to any of the article sub-types described above under 'primary research/field report formats', i.e. a technical addendum or companion article to a published article which is designed to present: i) a tutorial of detailed analyses methods including relevant program code with sufficient information to enable other investigators to replicate the analyses; ii) an expanded article presenting a detailed study protocol with sufficient information to enable other investigators to replicate a study presented in one of the less detailed or rapid communication article sub-types described above (which may have been published in jHASE or elsewhere), or iii) one of the 'study methodology articles' described below under section 1.3.

     

  • 1.2. Case reports of public health importance/implications for HIV Surveillance & Epidemiology: Reports of clinical cases of public health importance that can be educational, describe a diagnostic or therapeutic dilemma, suggest an association, or present an important adverse reaction. The length of a case report should not exceed the limit set for research dispatches from the field, as outlined above. All case report articles submitted to jHASE must be of demonstrated public health importance and implications for HIV Surveillance & Epidemiology, and should be accompanied by written and signed consent to publish the information from the patients or their guardians.
     

  • 1.3. Study methodology articles: 

    • 1.3.1. Methodology/procedures articles: Present new surveillance/study/experimental methods, tests or procedures. The methods described may either be completely new, or may offer a better version of an existing method. The article must describe a demonstrable advance on what is currently available. The method needs to have been well tested and ideally, but not necessarily, used in a way that proves its value.

    • 1.3.2. Methods protocols of study design and procedures: Describe proposed, ongoing or published article's research methods, providing a detailed account of the hypothesis, rationale, design and procedures of the study. Submitted protocols must include all elements that would be ordinarily required by PHS/NIH guidelines or for IRBs review as ethics issues will also be peer-reviewed for all protocols submitted.  Protocol topics may be in the following areas:

      • HIV/AIDS surveillance & related Epidemiology research protocols; and 

      • Public Health intervention/practice protocols;

    • 1.3.3. Protocols of statistical analyses and data management methods and software: Review and describe proposed, ongoing or published articles' statistical analyses, specifically providing a detailed account of the hypotheses, statistical analyses methods and the rationale thereof, corresponding statistical software program procedures or menu-driven analyses steps, and/or data management procedures/tools. Generic protocols/reviews may describe statistical software programs, applications, tools or statistical algorithm implementations typically used in HIV/AIDS surveillance and Epidemiology studies or data management. Submitted protocols must include relevant statistical methodology elements, if any, that would be ordinarily required by PHS/NIH guidelines or for IRBs review as ethics issues will also be peer-reviewed for all protocols submitted. Typically, descriptions/reviews of the statistical analyses software programs will include statistical software programs and/or step-by-step tutorial-format archive of screenshots with the submitted manuscript in supplementary files. Statistical analyses protocol topics may be in the following areas:

      • HIV/AIDS surveillance & Epidemiology statistical analyses protocols; 

      • Public Health intervention/practice statistical analyses protocols; and

      • Data Management procedures/algorithms;

    • 1.3.4. The journal uses the two key methods protocol article types indicated below for peer-reviewed work. The two article types for both methods procedures and statistical analyses protocols are as follows:

      • Standard length protocols: Fully fledged protocols following NIH (or jHASE methods section) guidelines, including an abstract/summary (also see the Expanded research/field reports format described above under 1.1.2.);
      • Abstract/summary of protocols: Abstracts/summaries of  protocols may be used for rapid communications of important study/analyses concepts.

 

2. Reviews, commentaries, chronicles and editorials:  author-initiated or jHASE-commissioned.

jHASE encourages leaders in the applied HIV/AIDS Epidemiology field and experts in particular relevant areas to submit discursive articles to the journal. jHASE hereby declares that it has an interest in a wide range of particular subject areas within the field and encourages authors to suggest commissioned works, including a series of related articles which may make up a monograph. The distinct categories of articles below indicate that such articles are judged by standards distinct from those used for the mainstream research articles. Examples of article types within this category are as follows:

  • 2.1. Editorials: These are short articles written by members of the Editorial Board describing policy issues relevant to the journal. For example, jHASE has written an editorial for the launch of the journal explaining why it was started. Editorials are usually 1000-1500 words. These can also be used to highlight new article types launched in the journal and any policy changes.

  • 2.2. Reviews: Comprehensive, authoritative, reviews of the state-of-the art or literature on any subject within the journalís scope. In addition to reviews initiated by authors, opinion leaders that have been invited by the Editorial Board may write these articles. They have an educational aim and are 2000-3000 words. These can be broken down into topical types such as basic science and clinical reviews, ethics, legislative and regulatory affairs, pro/con debates, equipment, textbook and software reviews and thematic series to highlight/summarize specific topics in the field of applied HIV/AIDS Epidemiology.

  • 2.3. Commentaries: Short, focused and opinionated articles on any subject within the journalís scope. These articles are usually related to a contemporary issue, such as recent research findings, and are often written by opinion leaders invited by the Editorial Board. They focus on specific issues and are about 1500 words. The commentaries section may be broken down into several types including ethics, technology, research-related, review-related, general interest, debates, and reviews of recently published papers from this and other journals in the field. 

  • 2.4. Hypotheses: Short articles presenting an untested original hypothesis backed solely by previously published results rather than any new evidence. They should outline significant progress in thinking that would also be testable, and be about 1500 words. 

  • 2.5. Debate articles: Present an argument that is not essentially based on practical research. Debate articles can report on all aspects of the subject including Public Health law, regulations, sociological and ethical aspects related to HIV/AIDS Surveillance, applied HIV Epidemiology research and Public Health practice.

3. Additional  guidelines on manuscript sections/article formatting (and examples) of each specific article type are provided below:
 
 

HIV Epidemiology

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific

Worldwide HIV Data

>Africa
>Americas
>Asia-Pacific
>Europe
>Middle East
>South Asia

Basic HIV Epi 

> What's HIV/AIDS?
>

Transmission
Modes

>

Infection Process

 

IEPH Features
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